Reading

The Glebe Primary School’s Approach to Reading

 

Early Years Foundation Stage (Nursery and Reception)

Reading begins in EYFS where children are introduced to Letters and Sounds which is a daily systematic phonics programme. Children are also introduced to Action Words which are used to support the children in learning tricky words and to develop their sight vocabulary.

Children begin to read books which are based on their phonics knowledge and high frequency words that they have been taught.

Books are taken home regularly. Children are encouraged to share books at home with their family members. When children are ready, they begin to take home reading book based on their phonics knowledge and ability.

Reading has an integral part of the Early Years Curriculum and children have opportunities to look at books in the book corner, hear adults read to them regularly and develop their individual interests through the reading curriculum.

 

Key Stage One (Year 1 and 2)

In Key Stage One, children continue to work on Letters and Sounds. This takes place across every morning for twenty minutes when children are split into ability groups which are led by teachers and teaching assistants.

At the end of year one, children complete the National phonics screening check to assess their phonics knowledge. Children who do not reach the required standard complete a screening check in year two. All children continue their phonics journey until the end of the letters and sounds programme.

Reading is overtly taught in both English lessons and across the curriculum, with teaching staff modelling how to read a wide variety of texts which children will work with.

Guided reading takes place which gives teachers the chance to hear reading, discuss new words, spelling patterns and check children’s understanding of the text.

Reading books are taken home three times a week, accompanied by a Reading Record book, which gives children and parents/carers a chance to write about the book and add any extra comments which they think are necessary.

The reading scheme is Oxford Reading Tree but this is supplemented by many other books which have been levelled by staff. Children are aware of what reading level they are on and also which is the next level they aspire to.

Reading progress is assessed regularly both through hearing children read and through a termly assessment to inform teachers if extra support may be needed or if children need additional challenge in their reading journey.

 

Lower Key Stage Two (Years 3 and 4)

Children are expected to read at home at least four times a week and to write two reading comments and a reading challenge comment in their reading record. A signature or comment from a parent or carer is also encouraged. Children are rewarded through an individual class reward system.

Phonics programmes remain in place (letters and sounds/direct phonics/Nessy) for children who did not reach the standard in the phonics screening check in Year 2. Each class also has a list of priority readers. Priority readers are children who are not reading confidently or fluently. These children read daily with an adult. Some children are placed in small reading groups to develop their decoding skills, fluency and confidence.

With all children we also use vocabulary mind maps to support the retention of vocabulary. These vocabulary mind maps include questions such as, ‘what does the word sound like?’

Each class has a reading comprehension session each week, where children complete specific reading tasks. Children are placed in differentiated groups across the year group, which are supported by teachers and teaching assistants. The comprehension sessions are led by focused comprehension skills. In the comprehension sessions, the adult models how to answer the questions using information from the text. Sessions may start with questions that the children were unsure about in the previous session.  Pupils are targeted with questions, extensions or support.

Strategies to engage boys with reading include books chosen by boys themselves, comics and magazines. These children are also encouraged to read on the iPads. Texts within lessons are boy friendly. We also run reading competitions which engage Boys.

Children carry out reading tasks through other lessons, including reading a range of different genres of fiction and non-fiction texts. Children answer reading comprehensions about these, annotate and highlight texts and read individually, in pairs and as a whole class.

Teachers have a class book and this is shared and discussed together during story time. Each class also has a reading corner, where reading is promoted. Within this corner, there is a recommended read section, where children can recommend their book to other children in the class. 

Each class completes a reading assessment at the end of each term and this is recorded as a comprehension age and whether the child is at the expected level. The ages are also tracked against the pupil’s chronological age and compared against the pupil’s age. This is to ensure progress is continuing to be made. If the pupil needs more support, immediate intervention is given, often in small group support.

 

Upper Key Stage Two (Years 5 and 6)

Children are expected to read at home at least four times a week for 20 minutes (school home-loan or own books) and write four comments a week in their Reading Record. A signature from a parent or carer is also encouraged. Children are encouraged to use the Reading Bingo sheet to write two of their comments – this is designed to help them write reflective comments about what they have read. Children receive a prize if they complete all the Reading Bingo tasks by the end of the term. Teachers monitor the type/range of books being read by the child, how often they are reading and how many pages they are reading.

Each class has a list of priority readers. Priority readers are children who children who did not pass the phonics screening check in year two, do not read regularly at home or who are making slow progress. These children read regularly with an adult.

End of term Reading Age tests (PIRA) are used to track a child’s comprehension progress and their comprehension age in comparison to their chronological age. Whenever it is noted that a child is falling behind, at any point in the term, immediate intervention is put in place.

All Y5 and Y6 children carry out Reading Plus on iPads (3 x 30 min sessions per week) to increase reading speed, reading comprehension skills, vocabulary knowledge and as well as using technology to encourage reading – particularly for any reluctant boy readers.

We have spoken to boys about what they like reading and we have bought books that they have suggested for our classroom reading corners. There is also a UKS2 reading book box that gets passed around the classes which contains a lot of non-fiction and more boy based topical books.

Children carry out reading tasks through other lessons, including reading a range of different genres of fiction and non-fiction texts. Children answer reading comprehensions about these, annotate and highlight texts and read individually, in pairs and as a whole class.

Teachers have a class book and this is shared and discussed together during story time. In Y6, Mrs Repton reads the class story to the children to promote the importance of reading. Each class also has a reading corner, where reading for enjoyment is promoted.

Guided reading sessions are streamed through ability groups to ensure that the text is level appropriate. We plan the texts we use around topics that we think will engage boys, or that are relevant to our current Topic or Science unit. Comprehension sessions are led by focused comprehension skills. In these sessions, adults models how to answer the questions using information from the text and spend time discussing the text as they are reading it. Pupils are targeted with questions, extensions or support.

If you would like to know more about reading, please speak to your child’s class teacher.